NEW YORK -- After watching Mark Teixeira endure one of his most frustrating nights of the season by hitting into two double plays and leaving eight men on base, manager Joe Girardi altered his lineup for Game No. 162 on Wednesday night.

Girardi dropped Teixeira to sixth in New York's batting order, with Robinson Cano and Nick Swisher hitting fourth and fifth, respectively, against Red Sox right-hander Daisuke Matsuzaka.

"Swish is just swinging really well," Girardi said. "We're going to put Swish in the fifth [spot], and it just keeps some space between our left-handers with the two switch-hitters between them. I love the way Swish is swinging the bat."

Swisher is hitting .393 (22-for-56) with four homers and 14 RBIs over his last 15 games, hitting safely in 14 of those contests. Teixeira, meanwhile, is playing just his third game since returning from a left calf strain and heard boos after several of his at-bats on Tuesday.

"I've always said it, I've been booed since the first month I got here," Teixeira said. "When you don't perform well, you boo yourself. No one's more upset about it than I am. I'm a fan, too. Georgia Tech lost by [21] points at home to Middle Tennessee State last week and I was not happy about that game. I know what it's like to be a fan."

Girardi acknowledged he isn't sure what to expect out of Teixeira, which could bear watching as the Yankees progress deeper into October.

"We were fairly consistent when guys are here for a period of time, but when guys aren't and they're coming into the lineup, you have to see where people are at," Girardi said. "Sometimes you have to shuffle things around, but it's nice to be getting all our pieces back where we have our switch-hitters and we can break up the lefties. That's a good thing."

Girardi added that he remains committed to batting Alex Rodriguez in the No. 3 spot. Rodriguez has eight hits in his last 38 at-bats, going 2-for-5 in Tuesday's 4-3 win.

"The one thing is, he has been getting on base," Girardi said. "That's important in front of Robbie Cano; we want those RBI opportunities and guys are driving him in. At any point, we know the damage that he can do."

After 43-pitch outing, Soriano might not be available

NEW YORK -- Rafael Soriano threw a season-high 43 pitches to help the Yankees post a 4-3, 12-inning victory over the Red Sox on Tuesday, and manager Joe Girardi was not certain he had the services of his closer one night later.

"I'm not sure. We'll have to see," Girardi said. "The good thing is he hadn't worked a lot up to that point, but we'll have to see how he feels."

Soriano allowed a ninth-inning solo homer to James Loney, giving the Red Sox a 3-1 lead at the time, and then pitched a scoreless 10th after Raul Ibanez's pinch-hit game-tying home run.

The right-hander usually tells Girardi that he is ready to pitch, but he battled something of a dead arm after throwing 32 pitches across both ends of a Sept. 19 doubleheader against the Blue Jays. In four appearances since then, Soriano has a blown save and has allowed three runs -- including two homers -- in 4 1/3 innings (6.23 ERA).

"The curious thing is how he can bounce back from that as we move forward," Girardi said. "We've been in playoff baseball basically for a month, and guys in that room are used to winning, and guys in that room are used to stepping up. That's what he did last night by going two innings for us. Guys are going to want to be out there, and it's our job to make sure that they're OK."

Cervelli stayed positive while spending year in Minors

NEW YORK -- Francisco Cervelli said that his dash around the basepaths in Tuesday's victory "makes my season," as the Yankees' backup catcher played a large role in helping the club maintain a one-game advantage in the American League East.

Cervelli worked a tough full-count walk from Boston's Andrew Miller in the 12th inning of New York's 4-3 win on Tuesday, and he then raced around the bases and tumbled into home plate with the decisive run as Raul Ibanez connected for the game-winning hit.

"It's amazing. It's amazing," Cervelli said. "But you know what? Things happen for a reason. You appreciate life a little more, you take care of your life a little more, and I know something good's going to happen in the future. My family always says, 'If you work hard, positive things are going to be around you.'"

Cervelli entered Spring Training as the Yankees' primary backup catcher, but he was blindsided before Opening Day by a trade with the Giants for Chris Stewart, who bumped Cervelli to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.

General manager Brian Cashman said that if there had been an injury to starting catcher Russell Martin, Cervelli -- and not Stewart -- would have stepped in as the starting catcher. But that never happened, and Cervelli spent a tough summer playing for the nomadic Scranton/Wilkes-Barre team, batting .246 in 99 games.

"I feel like those things happened like five years ago," Cervelli said. "We've got to move on, keep moving forward, because I'm only 26 years old, and no one's going to stop my dream. My dream is to be a big league player for the next 10, 12 [years] -- whatever God wants. And no one's going to stop me."

Bombers bits

• In the event the Yankees and Orioles finish Wednesday tied for the American League East, there would be a 7:10 p.m. ET tiebreaker played on Thursday in Baltimore, Major League Baseball announced.

Andy Pettitte would be in line to start that game, which would be played at Camden Yards because though the Yankees and Orioles finished 9-9 head-to-head, the Orioles (43-28) had a better record than the Yankees (40-31) against the AL East this season, entering play on Wednesday.

• According to the Elias Sports Bureau, Ibanez became the first player in Yankees history to hit a game-tying home run in extra innings and then get a walk-off RBI in the same game. The last Yankees player to log a game-tying, ninth-inning RBI and then pick up a walk-off RBI in extra innings was Graig Nettles in 1973.

Additionally, Ibanez became the first Yankee over the age of 40 to log a walk-off RBI in extra innings since Enos "Country" Slaughter on Aug. 4, 1957, in the second game of a doubleheader against the Indians.

• On this date in 1947, Yankees pitcher Bill Bevens held the Dodgers hitless until two outs in the ninth inning when pinch-hitter Cookie Lavagetto doubled in two runs for a 3-2 Brooklyn victory in Game 4 of the World Series.