ARI@NYM: Goldschmidt puts D-backs on board with homer

NEW YORK -- Paul Goldschmidt rarely gets days off, and given all the grief his D-backs teammates gave him for being out of the lineup Wednesday night, he probably would have rather played.

Coming into Wednesday, Goldschmidt, who had not started two games all year and entered one of those two later on, was given the day off against Mets ace Matt Harvey. The last time Goldschmidt was not in the lineup was Game 2 of a doubleheader on May 27.

D-backs manager Kirk Gibson did not ask Goldschmidt if he wanted a day off, he simply told him that's the way it was going to be.

"He's getting an off-day," Gibson said. "I've been thinking about it, been talking about it. Just watching him and seeing some certain things. Just think it's time."

Shortstop Cliff Pennington decided to have some fun with the news, giving Goldschmidt a bottle of vitamins. The bottle's label was covered with athletic tape, and on it, Pennington wrote "Harvey-itis."

Below that, Pennington scribbled, "Symptoms: excess velocity, sharp curves and disappearing changeups."

"They're giving me a hard time," Goldschmidt said. "It's all in good fun."

Goldschmidt planned to take it a little easy pregame, but he also said he was going to be ready if needed during the game.

"You just try and just relax a little bit and enjoy it at least for the first few innings, and then get ready if you have to come into the game at the end," he said.

Goldschmidt has not faced Harvey before and had been looking forward to the challenge.

"I think as a hitter, you definitely want to test yourself against the best," Goldschmidt said. "And he's one of the best, if not the best, in the National League right now."

Bloomquist placed on DL; Campana called up

ARI@NYM: Campana cuts down Murphy stretching single

NEW YORK -- With infielder Willie Bloomquist's left hand not improving, the D-backs on Wednesday placed him on the disabled list and recalled outfielder Tony Campana from Triple-A Reno.

Bloomquist was hit in the hand by a pitch last Wednesday and has not been able to play since, leaving the D-backs a man short on the bench.

"Willie's just not progressing, and we've been playing short so we made the decision that we would go the other way with him," D-backs manager Kirk Gibson said.

Campana was acquired from the Cubs just after the start of Spring Training and battled for the final outfield spot on the roster before he was sent to Reno.

The speedster was hitting .288 and was 24-for-28 in stolen-base attempts for the Aces.

"I started off really slow, and I've been feeling really good lately and I've been swinging the bat well," Campana said. "I think I just got a little more aggressive. I went down there and was trying to take a lot of pitches, and it didn't go the way I wanted it to."

In order to get to New York in time for the game, Campana took a red-eye flight that landed around 7 a.m.

When he reported to the ballpark, Campana found his name penciled in the lineup in the leadoff spot.

"It's awesome. Nothing wakes you up like that," he said of starting right away. "I got a few hours [sleep]. I got enough, for sure."

Snake bites

• The D-backs have still not announced a starter for Friday's game against the Rockies.

It was supposed to be Trevor Cahill's turn, but the right-hander was placed on the 15-day disabled list Monday.

Triple-A left-hander Tyler Skaggs appears to be the front-runner to make the start.

• Outfielder Gerardo Parra was out of the lineup for the second straight night after diving headfirst onto the warning track during Monday night's game and suffering cuts to his face and bruises to his body.

• Gibson talked a little while back with Giants manager Bruce Bochy, who will skipper the National League All-Star team.

One of the players whom Gibson made a case for Bochy selecting to the team was first baseman Paul Goldschmidt.

"He would enjoy his time [with Goldschmidt]," Gibson said. "And when he's done coaching, he's a guy that he would want to have coached, had a chance to spend some time with and I just wanted to relay that."