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7/22/2014 9:28 P.M. ET

Reddick returns from DL with right knee brace

OAKLAND -- Josh Reddick returned to the A's roster on Tuesday with a right knee brace he plans on wearing for the remainder of the season.

"I know, now, with this brace on, that it's not going to move left, right, out and in like it's not supposed to," said Reddick, who doesn't lose any mobility with it. "This brace is just giving me that extra security knowing I can go out there and do what I need to do."

Oakland's right fielder missed three weeks with a right knee sprain, having already been resigned to the disabled list for the majority of June because of the same injury. There are no indications he'll need surgery at any point.

"It's not any one particular thing in there that's tweaked," Reddick said. "They just see a lot of inflammation in there with some tendons. Maybe just something that needs rest, but that's something I can't afford to get right now."

Reddick was not in the A's lineup Tuesday but is expected to get the bulk of playing time in right field against right-handers. The A's face several in the next week, allowing manager Bob Melvin to do some juggling with his other left-handed bats.

Brandon Moss is likely to play first base on those days, with Stephen Vogt able to DH until he can catch again. Melvin said a foot issue has restricted him from those duties as of late.

Reddick brought a .229 average into Monday's game. He went 9-for-21 (.429) with three home runs, two doubles and eight RBIs in five games during his rehab stint with Class A Advanced Stockton and had "no issues" with the knee while fielding.

"Obviously it's not big league pitching," he said, "but anytime you can go down there and do well, it's a confidence booster."

The A's optioned infielder Andy Parrino to Triple-A Sacramento to make room for Reddick.

Milone reaches out to Melvin after requesting trade

OAKLAND -- As word leaked Monday that Tommy Milone had requested a trade, the A's lefty reached out to manager Bob Melvin.

"He got a hold of me when this was all coming out," Melvin said Tuesday. "I'm pretty sure he didn't expect it to get the play it has, but to an extent, he's looking out for his big league career, and he's pitched really well for us. You don't blame him for wanting to be in the big leagues."

FOXSports.com's Ken Rosenthal was first to report of Milone's desire to go elsewhere. The news came just two weeks after the lefty was optioned to Triple-A amid the acquisitions of Jeff Samardzija and Jason Hammel, even after going 6-0 record and 2.62 ERA in his last 11 starts.

It was his second demotion in the last year.

"He wants to pitch in the big leagues," said Melvin. "He'd much rather do it here, but when you've had the type of success he's had and you're pitching in the Minor Leagues, that's not somewhere he wants to be.

"It doesn't mean he doesn't want to be here. He does want to be here. He's well thought of by his teammates, well respected by his teammates, and he respects the situation going on here, but he wants to be in the big leagues, and I don't blame him for that."

Milone provides the A's unmatched pitching depth at Triple-A, so it's unlikely he's traded -- unless the A's opt to use their extra arms (Drew Pomeranz included) as trade bait to reel in an upgrade at second base.

Donaldson wins A's Heart and Hustle Award

OAKLAND -- Josh Donaldson may now be an All-Star, but that does not mean the third baseman's determination has waned. On Tuesday, he was recognized for his more intangible qualities, receiving the A's Heart and Hustle Award for a second consecutive year.

The award, voted on by the Major League Baseball Players Alumni Association, honors players who "demonstrate a passion for the game of baseball and best embody the values, spirit and tradition of the game."

Donaldson forged an arduous and untraditional path to the big leagues, and now that he's more established, his work ethic remains the same.

"That award probably is tailor made for him," said A's manager Bob Melvin. "He does play with a lot of heart, he's dirty all the time, hard-nose player. Congratulations to him for that -- not a surprise that he won it for a second year in a row."

"I just try to grind every day," Donaldson said. "Baseball is a long season. You can only control a few things in the game, and I feel like that's one of them."

Donaldson entered Tuesday's series opener against the Astros with 21 home runs and a team-leading 70 RBIs, but he's taken his share of lumps. It's during the lows that his mental fortitude becomes essential.

"When you're going through those lulls," Donaldson said, "it makes it more difficult with the frustration that builds. But whenever you can move past that frustration, you normally end up starting to roll again."

One player from each MLB team receives the award, and a final winner is announced after the season.

Worth noting

Alberto Callaspo (right hamstring strain) was expected to resume baseball activities on Tuesday and will likely begin a rehab assignment shortly after. He is eligible to be activated from the disabled list on Sunday.

Jane Lee is a reporter for MLB.com. Aaron Leibowitz is an associate reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.